Tennis: Roger Federer the lovable PR juggernaut and a wizard from Hogwarts

There have been recent sightings of Roger Federer, the PR  juggernaut, in Shanghai doing the Mickey dance with lord Mickey Mouse himself and enjoying the metro ride with the locals. Don’t we all love Roger at his charming best, mingling with the mortals and trying so hard to make us believe that neither he nor his game is beyond earth?

 

Federer’s style of play cannot be taught

Federer’s media appearances are mildly successful attempts to convince the media on how hard he has trained and worked to develop an effortless style of play. However, no coach alive has fallen for the myth that hard work can turn a talented player into Roger Federer, and they refuse to devote even a minute teaching or promoting Roger Federer‘s style of tennis because they know it cannot be taught.

 

Roger is a tennis wizard from Hogwarts and friend of Harry Potter

Many even believe that Roger Federer is a wizard from Hogwarts and can defy gravity to float on the court, move to the net, and execute strange yet beautiful looking fencing moves with his racket at will. The fact that Roger does all that and more at the ripe old age of 36 helps add credibility to the legend of Roger’s the tennis wizard from Hogwarts and a close friend of Harry Potter.

 

Hard work comes naturally to Nadal and Djokovic

You want to see hard work reeking of blood, sweat and tears then look no further than Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic who slog on the court to fetch every ball landing on their side of the net and take pride in not letting a ball pass through them. They don’t mind looking like warriors embroiled in a battle and embrace sweat, fist pumps, body contortions, and the rest with pride. Whereas, Roger comes out of a match with hair in place, absolutely no sweat on the t-shirt and well-rehearsed words for his fans.

While Roger was busy with his PR duties in Tokyo, Nadal was giving  Nick Kyrgios a lesson in tough and intense tennis in Beijing. Nadal, then immediately arrived in Shanghai to prepare for the Shanghai Masters. Now, this is hard work. Not dancing with Mickey.

  • Helen Farrell

    Not entirely sure what the point is here? Does anyone actually think that Roger doesn’t work hard at his game? Personally, I like Roger’s style in the same way I love early Beatles records – they always sound as though they just got up that morning and decided it would be fun to make a record that day.(it was an illusion obviously – reflecting hours and hours of work) Nadal and Djoko are like later Beatles – you can have incredible admiration for the skill involved but I don’t warm to it as much. I quite see why people might prefer it though – shouldn’t we just be glad they all play at the same time?

    • wissahickon

      Agree… Roger works VERY hard behind the scenes… he always wants his game to look easy, but anyone who plays tennis knows that he is a genius.